Virtual Nordic ISS Seminar Consortium

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Below you can see the list of past seminars. 

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titleSeptember 4 - Aalto University School of Business

Information Systems Science at Aalto University School of Business has a strong focus on empirical studies and active cooperation with companies. Besides theoretical contributions, ISS studies often emphasize practical relevance. Our research deals with adoption, use and impacts of ICT on consumers, companies, and society at large. We use multi-disciplinary approaches and apply theories from a number of reference disciplines, including management, organization sciences, marketing, and economics. Wide range of both qualitative and quantitative methods are used and often triangulated. Research teams and projects are encouraged. Most projects have both national and international partners, and the results of our research are targeted at top tier academic journals. Read more.


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titleEsko Penttinen's Presentation

Understanding the Development of Latent Skill Erosion in the Age of Knowledge-Work Automation

With Tapani Rinta-Kahila, Antti Salovaara, and Wael Soliman.

Abstract: Information systems enable organizations to automate more and more of their knowledge-work tasks. Though offering higher efficiency and lower costs, automation can exacerbate erosion of humans’ skills. Scholars have charted antecedents to technology-induced skill erosion but have not examined how dividing the work between humans and automated systems affects that erosion over time. To identify such mechanisms, the authors conducted a case study of an accounting firm where workers gradually lost their skills through years of reliance on software’s automated functions. Analysis building on Braverman’s classic distinction between conception and execution found that when data‑processing tasks’ execution was assigned to automation, the accountants’ skills began to erode as they relinquished their conception of the tasks. The article explains why skill erosion is a process that may occur latently, acknowledged by neither workers nor managers. It discusses these insights’ implications for theory and practice, also identifying directions for future research.

See the slides here

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titleYong Liu's Presentation

Robotic Service Property and Service Performance: Modeling the Effect of Robotic Cuteness on Users Responses - Research-in-progress

Abstract: Even though AI service robots, with anthropomorphic features, are expected to replace human personal to offer customers services, recent laboratory studies warn about consumers resistance to such replacement due to the barriers, such as a lack of trust and perceptions of threats. In this study, we explore consumers evaluations on utilitarian, hedonic and anthropomorphic properties of AI service robots, and their respective impacts on consumers responses (customer satisfaction and delight) in real business contexts of hotel operations. Through studying consumer reviews on robotic service of the hotels implementing AI service robot, we find that consumers evaluations on utilitarian property associates with a high customer satisfaction, while evaluations on hedonic property lead to customer delight. Evaluations on robot anthropomorphic property of cuteness increase both customer satisfaction and delight. Compared to the customers without using robotic service, customers who used robotic service expressed more joy in their reviews. and are more likely to re-patronage the service brand, resulting in more future customer reviews. Through an analysis of over 12 million customer reviews, we demonstrated that hotels deploying service robots achieve significant better business performance than the hotels not implementing the service.

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titleSeptember 11 - Copenhagen Business School
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titleTill Winkler's Presentation

IT Service Management Practices, Capability, and Strategies for the Digital Era

See the slides here

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titleAttila Marton's Presentation

Digital Ecology

The notion of digital ecosystem has become a fruitful metaphor for examining the contemporary effects of digitalization across boundaries of organization, industry, lifeworld, mind, and body. In economic terms, the metaphor has inspired IS research into new kinds of business constellations while, in engineering terms, it has led to important insights into the design and governance of digital platforms. Approaching digital ecosystems studies in these terms, however, makes it difficult to trace and explain those effects of digitalization, which do not materialize predominantly in economic and engineering patterns. Hence, important relationships and their effects may go unnoticed. In response, I draw on the ecological epistemology of Gregory Bateson to complement economic and engineering approaches with an ecological understanding of digital ecosystems. Such an understanding, I argue, expands the possibilities for tracing and explaining the wide reaching, boundary crossing effects of digitalization and the runaway dynamics they may lead to. I suggest to do this based on three tenets of ecological thinking: (1) part-of-ness – phenomena are to be observed as always part of a larger ecosystem; (2) systemic wisdom – ecosystems have limits, which need to be respected; and (3) information ecosystems – ecosystems are not mechanical but informational, cognitive systems. As my contribution, I propose six avenues for future IS research into digital ecology, examining digital ecosystems as actual rather than metaphorical ecological systems.

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titleSeptember 18 - Uppsala University
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titleOwen Eriksson's Presentation

Digital institutionalization: The digital construction of reality.

Institutional reality is changing as a result of digitalization, and “Digital institutionalization” is changing the way we think about, and create the entities of institutional reality. The creation, exchange and use of institutional entities such as medical prescriptions, owners, traffic vehicles, patient records, products, purchase orders, money, insurances, taxes etc., are fundamental for society. Digital infrastructures are one of the most powerful forces of institutional change, because they change social interaction and practices on a mass scale. Digital infrastructures in institutional contexts mediates rights (deontic powers) conforming to conceptualizations, rules and norms. Digital institutionalization relates to the ontology status of information systems. Information systems are not just “Representations of reality” they are used to constitute digital institutional reality. This relates to ontological questions such as:

  • What entities exists?
  • How and where do they exist?
  • How do we identify them?

However, these questions and the answers to them, are not only of interest for philosophical reasons. They have theoretical and practical implications for conceptual modelling, digital infrastructure design, and the digitalization of institutions and practices.

See the slides here

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titleElin Uppström's Presentation

Facilitating the creation of sustainable digital innovation in the cultural heritage domain.

With Carl-Mikael Lönn

In this early research in progress we study digital innovations developed within an incubator program offered by the Swedish National Heritage Board. The incubator gives support to entrepreneurs and businesses in developing and realizing innovative ideas related to cultural heritage. The overall objective of the incubator is to promote innovation and entrepreneurship related to digitization, digital availability and digital dissemination. Through interviews, observations and secondary sources we investigate values that are enabled by the digital innovations, the innovation ecosystem surrounding digital innovations, the digital business models supporting the innovations, and co-creation and co-destruction of value. 
 All of the innovations increase the availability to the cultural heritage and many of the studied innovations augments and form a rich experience of the cultural heritage through different techniques such as augmented reality, virtual reality, immersive media and storytelling. Although, these promising innovations enriches and provide interesting ways to experience cultural heritage, we identified barriers for creating viable and sustainable digital business models. We also see an innovation ecosystem for digitalization of cultural heritage that includes several important players, where value is co-created and co-destructed. Contradictions in the relationships within the ecosystem are also observed, especially related to open data. By reasoning on these observations, we contribute with knowledge on how digital innovation within the cultural heritage can benefit from further incorporating the ideas of open innovation and co-creation.

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titleSeptember 25 - University of Agder
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titleSara Hofmann's Presentation

Uncovering the multifaceted concept of digitalisation: How do researchers and practitioners define public sector digitalisation?

For decades, the public sector employs ICT to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of both internal processes and interactions with external stakeholders. Ever since, researchers have investigated potentials and consequences of the widespread use of ICT in the public domain. However, they do so by referring to the same phenomenon under a multitude of labels, such as digitalisation, e-government, and – lately – digital transformation. Similarly, practitioners use different words to describe the similar or same process: the widespread use of ever more sophisticated technologies within public administrations. Our research sets out to uncover the different meanings of the term ‘digitalisation’ both in research and practice. We apply an exploratory approach and conduct a structured literature review to account for the use of the term in research. To uncover different meanings of the term in practice, we conducted 16 semi-structured qualitative interviews with public servants from different administrative levels in Germany. Results of both analyses provide insights into existing ambiguities related to the use of this term in a public sector context. Neither researchers nor practitioners seem to share a common understanding of what digitalisation is. In total, we derive eight different themes to which researchers and practitioners are referring when talking about digitalisation. Our analysis highlights the need for a more stringent use of terms and the need to be more explicit about the meaning attached to commonly used concepts.

See the slides here

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titleØystein Sæbø's Presentation

What to open and what not: the role of digital technologies for balancing open practices within organizations.

Contemporary organisations are increasingly adopting open practices. Although openness in general is considered a positive quality, tensions concerning openness and closure exist and should be investigated, along with the role that digital technologies play in openness and closure for organisations. I’ll here address these issues by discussing how digital technologies help organisations balance openness and closure. Based on a longitudinal qualitative study of a social movement organisation (the Italian political movement named The Five Star Movement) we have explored how the levels of control and exchange between the internal and external parts of an organisation vary. As a result, we propose three archetypical configurations of organisational openness (Agora, Open Access and Selective Openness) that I would like to present and discuss. Furthermore, we reflect on the role of digital technologies within these configurations, reflecting on how they may play different roles in supporting openness and closure. The presentation is based on work conducted by Alessio Maria Braccini, Tommaso Federici and Øystein Sæbø.

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titleOctober 2 - University of Jyväskylä
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titleMarkus Salo's Presentation

A Set of Recent Studies on Technostress

Technostress refers to the situation of stress that an individual experiences due to her/his use of technology. Researchers and practitioners have highlighted that technostress is common and contributes to severe outcomes such as decreased well-being, reduced work productivity, and even burnout. Therefore, it is important to understand the causes and outcomes of technostress in various contexts as well as users’ ways for mitigating technostress. This presentation elaborates on the selected findings from a set of our recent studies on technostress and coping in both work and non-work contexts. Furthermore, we share thoughts about lessons learned from studying technostress and publishing technostress research in information systems (IS) journals and conferences. Overall, improved understanding on technostress can pave the way for better work productivity and well-being.

ResearchGate Profile / Markus Salo: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Markus_Salo

See the slides here

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titleTuure Tuunanen's Presentation

Concurrent Design and Evaluation Methodology for Design Science Research

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titleOctober 16 - University of Oulu
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titleOulu Advanced Research on Service and Information Systems (OASIS)

OASIS research unit within University of Oulu studies user behaviors and behavior change. Much of the work is in the intersection of information systems, behavioral science and health. In so doing, we focus on digital interventions and their design as persuasive technologies. Also the darker side of information technology including unintended consequences in spite of positive intent is addressed. More information: oasis.oulu.fi.

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titleHarri Oinas-Kukkonen's Presentation

Persuasive systems design for digital interventions: Case obesity and metabolic syndrome

This presentation will briefly describe the Persuasive Systems Design (PSD) model and the Behavior Change Support Systems framework (BCSS) for designing, evaluating and researching digital interventions. These provide an approach for digital intervention development and explain what kind of software functionality to implement in such systems. The PSD and BCSS can be used for evaluating both full-fledged interventions and lighter applications, their design and development, carrying out systematic literature reviews, designing and managing user experience, and digital intervention outcome research. Some interesting results from research project on prevention of obesity and metabolic syndrome will be presented. See the slides here
 
Harri Oinas-Kukkonen, Ph.D., is Professor of information systems science and Dean of Graduate School (doctoral education) in the University of Oulu, Finland. His research has been published in a variety of computer science, information systems, human-computer interaction, management and innovation, and health and medical informatics journals. He is a co-author of the book “Humanizing the Web: Change and Social Innovation” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013). His main research interests include digital interventions, behavior change, and persuasive systems design.

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titleINTERACT Research Unit

INTERACT Research Unit, University of Oulu, Faculty of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering, specializes in research and education on human-centered design and digitalization. INTERACT research contributes to Information Systems and Human Computer Interaction research with three main research themes: Politics of design; Digital Transformation; and Usability and User Experience (UX). For politics of design, INTERACT will contribute to emerging IS and HCI research interest on power and politics around design and technology, relying on critical research and design and Scandinavian Participatory Design traditions, addressing the topics in societal level as well as in close collaboration with children and schools. The digital transformation research stream is a more recent opening, improving our understanding of digital technologies’ role in industry and organization level transformation. One of our focus areas is the strong interdependence between public policy making and technology development, adoption and use on an industry-level and organization-level. We closely collaborate with the Finnish taxi industry. Finally, the Usability and User Experience research stream builds on over 30 years of INTERACT research, with focus on defining and evaluating usability and UX of various digital artefacts, theoretical development of usability and UX concepts and methods development to keep up with emerging challenges and developments in socio-technical digitalization. http://interact.oulu.fi/

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titleKarin Väyrynen's Presentation

Digital transformation of the Finnish taxi industry: Policy ambiguity and the rule of law

Governments and policy makers react to digital transformation at the level of industries and societies. A practical example of this is the rise of ridesharing services, which has created a legal grey area and has required cities and countries to re-consider existing taxi market regulation. In Finland, the taxi industry has been de-regulated in 2018, and – with the intention to make Uber-type services legal – the previous specific and clear taximeter regulation was replaced with an ambiguous one. In this seminar, I will address three related topics: (1) policy ambiguity and the rule of law, (2) relational digital transformation, and (3) how IS research can have an impact on policy making. I will introduce our ongoing research on the ambiguous taximeter regulation. I will introduce a number of concepts from legal studies that we deem useful when studying regulation and digital transformation. Regulations are one amongst many factors that affect the digital transformation of an industry. Current conceptualizations of digital transformation largely attribute transformation to intentionality, often focus on transformation within a single organization, or assign technology the role of a disruptive agent of change. In our study of the digital transformation of the Finnish taxi industry we realized that above conceptualization does not quite apply to what happened in Finland over the past 10 years. I will introduce relational digital transformation, a practice-theoretical approach we developed to study industry-level digital transformation without attributing change agency to any entities a priori. Finally, I will briefly talk about how or research has impacted policy making in Finland.

See the slides here